Tag Archives: sculpture

Junior Art Bird Sculptures

Over two terms the students in the Junior Art Extension class have been working on these wild, wacky and colourful bird sculptures. We started off by sketching and painting different exotic birds. Students then created papier-mâché bodies and the rocks using polystyrene balls and newspaper. They then used clay to create the beak, pompoms and googly eyes to make the eyes and pipe cleaners for the feet. Students also painted paper and used that to create feathers for their birds. This was a great project for students to experience working in a 3D medium with a variety of different mediums.

Chiaozza!!

This semester students in the Junior Art Extension Class have been looking at the work of collaborative duo, Adam Frezza and Terri Chiao, AKA Chiaozza (www.eternitystew.com). The students started with experimental sketches and paintings, followed by small clay ‘plant’ sculptures and culminated in creating larger papier-mâché plant sculptures. This project allowed students to work with a variety of different mediums and explore different colour and pattern combinations. The results are fantastic, hope you enjoy them as much we enjoyed making them!

There are some insects in the library!!

Congratulations to The Grade 4 Art Club for creating these amazing large-scale butterfly sculptures. These students spent every Friday lunchtime for three terms creating these amazing sculptures, which are now installed in the library.

Moth relief artworks

Last term, Grade 1 and 2 students looked at the work of American artist, Yumi Okita. Over 11 weeks, students created these stunning moth relief artworks made from textiles, cardboard and feathers. This artwork allowed students to explore the tactile nature of fibres, with a focus on texture. You can view these works in the hallway of the main building.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Finally some good spray painting at Bell!!

Since Term One, the Grade 4 lunchtime art club have been working on three large-scale butterfly sculptures that will accompany the Australian native flora mural, which a parent committee are currently working on. Students used black-out plastic from last year’s BIFF that was used to block out the light in the theatres and repurposed it by weaving it onto the armature of the sculptures and then finally spray painting it.

At lunchtime today and part of session 5, the art club students spray painted their butterfly sculptures with patterns inspired by the colouration and markings of the indigenous butterfly, the Meadow Argus.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Chris Ryniak inspired sculptures by Grade 5/6

I’d have to say that these sculptures were probably one of the most fun projects I’ve ever done with students! The Grade 5/6s really embraced this project and their creativity thrived! Five weeks ago, we came together as a class and discussed Ryniak’s aesthetic style, such as chubby tummies, warts, wrinkles, small in scale and monochromatic (in most cases). This rich discussion lead to a series of sketches, where students could start to imagine their creature on paper. The following weeks were all about the 3D work. Students experienced working with clay – thank you to the mums who came and helped me during the clay lessons, you were lifesavers!! Students learnt about mixed-media by working with faux fur, beads, wire, tissue paper, pipe cleaners and faux leather. To finish, students had to fill out a self-reflection sheet, which encouraged them to think about their ideas, craftsmanship, problem-solving strategies and skills they learnt or needed to employ to create their sculpture. Watching the students rush over to their sculpture at the beginning of the lesson and excitedly gather their materials to start creating filled me with joy! I’m so proud of these kids and the amazing work they do! Hopefully you enjoy looking at the sculptures, as much as we enjoyed making them!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Junior Art Extension Class

As most of you know, this year I am running a pilot program, which aims to give gifted students in the arts 100 minutes of art each week, instead of 50 minutes. The Junior Art Extension Class has been looking at the work of Jephan de Villiers , a French artist, who creates whimsical and peculiar sculptures of figures from natural materials. The students have spent upwards of 8 weeks on them and they are nearly all finished! The degree of attention to detail, technique, craftsmanship and composition of their pieces is astounding. They have captured the essence of de Villiers’ work beautifully and their level of skill at such a young age is quite inspiring. There will be a display coming soon!

Stuart – “My artwork is about two people who meet at a tree. They cover the tree in leaves. Then they had babies and they made the tree into their home.”

Zoe – “My artwork looks like lots of amazed people looking out from a large hole in a hollow tree. The little people are looking at a group of ginormous people having a picnic.”

Grade 5/6 lanterns

In term one, Grade 5/6 students created these exquisite tetrahedron lanterns. The students had to design and make a lantern that expressed some memorable learning they have done at school or the natural environment of the school grounds. They were all so different, which made them look even more interesting en masse. Below are some photos of the process and the final artworks. If you would like to see this display, please visit the hallway in the main building.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Preps and Grade 1/2s turn abstract prints into beautiful collages

Wow, sometimes students can blow you away with their creativity! Preps participated in three rotations; printing with eclectic objects, printing with things from the garden and marble art inspired by Jackson Pollock. The Grade 1/2s also did rotations; sculptures made from wire, wood and pipe cleaners, printing with eclectic objects and creating abstract paintings using wool as a starting point. The following week the students turned their abstract prints and paintings into beautiful collages. Boy did we get messy, but it was worth it!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.